Making a Difference

The impact of projects delivered by Boogie Mites have been evaluated by independent organisations. Here is a summary of some of the evaluations undertaken, with link to more detailed reports.

Chichester University Research

The Research Project
Impact: Parents
Impact: Children
Impact: Practitioners
An evaluation of Boogie Mites early years music education programmes

Research conducted by Chichester University concluded that Boogie Mites music programmes make a real difference to parents and practitioners of children in early years. The research objectives were:

  • To explore the influence of the Boogie Mites programmes on parental knowledge, confidence and home practise
  • To investigate the impact on children’s language, communication, physical, emotional and social development, as perceived by parents
  • To evaluate practitioner’s perceptions following training sessions by Boogie Mites
Practitioner Testimonial
Parental knowledge, confidence and home practice

Boogie Mites sessions encouraged parents to make the links between the EYFS prime areas of learning and the use of music both at the session and in the home. Parents reported that they felt more confident to use music with their children at home and as part of everyday life. The parents’ increased confidence had a knock-on effect on their child’s confidence.

Boogie Mites Impact Parents
Children’s development as perceived by parents

Quantitative data supported the inference that attending the Boogie Mites courses and practising at home promotes children’s social, communication and physical development. A very large majority of parents reported observing some or a lot of improvements in all 3 Prime areas.

Boogie Mites Impacts Children
Practitioner confidence and sharing best practice

A significant number of practitioners said that Boogie Mites training gave them the confidence to implement music-making in their setting. After completing their training, there was an explosion of enthusiasm, eagerness and willingness to implement what they had learnt. They were inspired to share what they learnt with the rest of the colleagues in their setting.

Boogie Mites Impacts Practitioners

Delivering Impact

An EYPP funded project
Virtual Transition Courses
Intergenerational courses
EYPP Funded Project Evaluation
How training made a difference
In June 2016, ten Paint Pots Nurseries in Southampton invested their EYPP to fund Boogie Mites practitioner training. Cat Baker, Quality and Curriculum Manager Paint Pots Nursery Group led a case study to assess the impact of the implementation of regular Boogie Mites music activities on children’s development. The study concluded that “Girls and boys across the settings have shown an average development rate increase of almost five months in comparison to the same period the previous year.” The case studies of individual EYPP funded children also identified a positive impact on development. Find out more about how Boogie Mites training can make a difference
Transition Evaluation
Boogie Mites transition courses help parents and children get school ready

In response to the pandemic, we developed an online course format for Hampshire County Council which included RARPA (Recognising and Recording of Progress and Achievement). Data collected was independently evaluated by Achievement For All (AFA).

AFA concludes: “The impact on parental knowledge around how their children learn and develop is an area of significant success with 100% of parents knowing at least a little about Letters and Sounds Phase 1 and are now able to recognise their child’s learning and development in relation to this.”

Intergenerational Evaluation
Wellbeing and community cohesion through music

In 2019 three settings caring for older people enjoyed weekly visits from children aged 10 months – 4 years, for shared music-making.

PhD student Liv Mclennan gathered feedback from parents, practitioners and the elderly taking part to evaluate the impact on wellness for all involved and community cohesion.

The conclusion was positive with a marked ‘feel good’ impact on all participants as well as benefits for confidence and social skills being observed.